ABOLISH THESE UNFAIR LAWS...........

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LETS ALL SIGN A PETITION NOW........

TO GOVENOR BUSH ,FLORIDA POLITICIANS,CITIZENS OF FLORIDA

THIS MESSAGE IS NOT THE ANSWER TO THE CRIME SOLUTION

IN FACT GOVERNMENT PRESS RELEASES ABOUT CRIME STATISTICS ARE USELESS. THE PUBLIC HAS BEEN SWAYED INTO BELIEVING THAT CRIME IS DOWN BECAUSE OF THE FOLLOWING LAWS AND NOTHING IS FURTHER FROM THE TRUTH.

ABOLISH THE FOLLOWING LAWS IN STATE OF FLORIDA FROM THE DAY THEY WERE VOTED IN AS A LAW BY READING AND SIGNING THIS PETITION



PRISONER RELEASEE REOFFENDER LAW

NO PAROLE OR GAIN TIME FOR LIFE SENTENCES LAW

HABITUAL OFFENDER LAW

THE DEATH PENALTY LAW

3 STRIKES AND THE MANDATORY MINIMUM LAW

The prisoner releasee reoffender law violates the constitutional principle of separation of powers and the right to due process of the law.

They are unfair as the re-convicted are serving time again for crimes for which they have already paid the penalty.

Too many young offenders are sentenced to life without a chance of parole.





There is no incentive to change without a chance of parole and the shortening of a sentence with good time. It becomes a very dangerous situation as the prisoners have nothing to lose by committing other felonies inside the prison.

ACLU Archives / 10 Reasons To Oppose Three Strikes, Youre
Out.. http://archive.aclu.org/library/pbr4.html

PRISON COSTS / Tallahassee Democrat..
http://prisonpotpourri.com/info/The\%20Tallahassee\%20Democrat\%20Online.htm

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA BRIAN DURDEN , Petitioner, v. ... - ... Law Weekly D1017 (Fla ... 5 CONCLUSION This court should find the Prisoner Releasee Reoffender Act unconstitutional as violations of separation of powers and of the ...
http://www.law.fsu.edu/library/flsupct/sc96479/96479rep.pdf

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA ROBERT L. STURGIS, )) Petitioner ... - ... of Classifying Defendant as a Prisoner Releasee Reoffender, pursuant to ... imposition upon a "prison releasee reoffender" of a ... fullest extent of the law" for all ...
http://www.law.fsu.edu/library/flsupct/sc96210/96210ans.pdf


[More results from www.law.fsu.edu]

dwight williams no. sc oo-534 another case lookadoo v. state So. 2nd 637 (fla. 5th dca 1999 DAYTONA BEACH,FL

St. Augustine, FL THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD
Man's criminal history equals greater sentence
Mar. 12 - A 15-year prison sentence will be changed for a St. Augustine man convicted of manslaughter in 1997. In a rare twist, a court of appeal said the sentence should be greater.
The criminal history of Fred Manning includes counts of burglary, grand theft, and most recently, robbery and manslaughter. He has been imprisoned four times in Florida since his first burglary conviction, as a 20-year-old, in 1989. His latest St. Johns County case is still bouncing back and forth between courts.
Last week, the 5th District Court of Appeal ruled that Manning's sentence for robbery and manslaughter in 1997 should be increased to 229 months -- which was his original sentence.
Circuit Judge Robert Mathis said Tuesday he will issue an order to reinstate the original sentence. He said Manning will not have to be present.
Mathis said he has not seen the appellate court return many cases for greater sentences. "It doesn't happen very often," Mathis said.
Manning, 33, now lives in the 1,132-bed Madison Correctional Institution in the Panhandle.
He had been out of prison for about four months in December 1997 when he got in a fight near a West Augustine convenience store. At 5 feet, 10 inches and 145 pounds, the three-time felon might not have seemed threatening. But Manning knocked down a 27-year-old Miami man with a punch to the jaw. The man's head hit a curb, and he died hours later in the emergency room of Flagler Hospital.
When St. Johns County sheriff's deputies arrested Manning in his mother's home, they also served him with a warrant for an earlier robbery on West King Street. He pleaded no contest to robbery and manslaughter in the St. Johns County Courthouse. He received 229 months as a "habitual felony offender" and "prisoner releasee reoffender."
A "prison releasee reoffender" commits a crime within three years of being released from prison. He must then receive the maximum sentence allowed by the law, Mathis said. For a second-degree felony like manslaughter, that would be 15 years in prison.
A "habitual felony offender" is, in part, someone who has been convicted of at least two felonies. He can receive a sentence that is up to twice the maximum -- or up to 30 years for manslaughter.
The appellate court in Daytona Beach approved the original sentence in 1999, when Manning appealed. But he reappeared before Mathis after his failed appeal.
Manning said his attorney forced him to plead no contest by telling him that if he didn't, his robbery and manslaughter sentences could run consecutively. His accusations against the attorney were discredited.
But Mathis re-sentenced him solely as a "prisoner releasee reoffender," thinking that Manning could not be sentenced as a "habitual felony offender" as well.
When St. Johns County sheriff's deputies arrested Manning in his mother's home, they also served him with a warrant for an earlier robbery on West King Street. He pleaded no contest to robbery and manslaughter in the St. Johns County Courthouse. He received 229 months as a "habitual felony offender" and "prisoner releasee reoffender."
A "prison releasee reoffender" commits a crime within three years of being released from prison. He must then receive the maximum sentence allowed by the law, Mathis said. For a second-degree felony like manslaughter, that would be 15 years in prison.
A "habitual felony offender" is, in part, someone who has been convicted of at least two felonies. He can receive a sentence that is up to twice the maximum -- or up to 30 years for manslaughter.
The appellate court in Daytona Beach approved the original sentence in 1999, when Manning appealed. But he reappeared before Mathis after his failed appeal.
Manning said his attorney forced him to plead no contest by telling him that if he didn't, his robbery and manslaughter sentences could run consecutively. His accusations against the attorney were discredited.
But Mathis re-sentenced him solely as a "prisoner releasee reoffender," thinking that Manning could not be sentenced as a "habitual felony offender" as well.

The state appealed

Assistant State Attorney Maureen Sullivan Christine could not be The criminal history of Fred Manning includes counts of burglary, grand theft, and most recently, robbery and manslaughter. He has been imprisoned four times in Florida since his first burglary conviction, as a 20-year-old, in 1989. His latest St. Johns County case is still bouncing back and forth between courts.
Last week, the 5th District Court of Appeal ruled that Manning's sentence for robbery and manslaughter in 1997 should be increased to 229 months -- which was his original sentence.
Circuit Judge Robert Mathis said Tuesday he will issue an order to reinstate the original sentence. He said Manning will not have to be present.
Mathis said he has not seen the appellate court return many cases for greater sentences. "It doesn't happen very often," Mathis said.
Assistant State Attorney Maureen Sullivan Christine could not be The criminal history of Fred Manning includes counts of burglary, grand theft, and most recently, robbery and manslaughter. He has been imprisoned four times in Florida since his first burglary conviction, as a 20-year-old, in 1989. His latest St. Johns County case is still bouncing back and forth between courts.
Last week, the 5th District Court of Appeal ruled that Manning's sentence for robbery and manslaughter in 1997 should be increased to 229 months -- which was his original sentence.
Circuit Judge Robert Mathis said Tuesday he will issue an order to reinstate the original sentence. He said Manning will not have to be present.
Mathis said he has not seen the appellate court return many cases for greater sentences. "It doesn't happen very often," Mathis said.

When St. Johns County sheriff's deputies arrested Manning in his mother's home, they also served him with a warrant for an earlier robbery on West King Street. He pleaded no contest to robbery and manslaughter in the St. Johns County Courthouse. He received 229 months as a "habitual felony offender" and "prisoner releasee reoffender

A "prison releasee reoffender" commits a crime within three years of being released from prison. He must then receive the maximum sentence allowed by the law, Mathis said. For a second-degree felony like manslaughter, that would be 15 years in prison.
A "habitual felony offender" is, in part, someone who has been convicted of at least two felonies. He can receive a sentence that is up to twice the maximum -- or up to 30 years for manslaughter.
The appellate court in Daytona Beach approved the original sentence in 1999, when Manning appealed. But he reappeared before Mathis after his failed appeal.
Manning said his attorney forced him to plead no contest by telling him that if he didn't, his robbery and manslaughter sentences could run consecutively. His accusations against the attorney were discredited.
But Mathis re-sentenced him solely as a "prisoner releasee reoffender," thinking that Manning could not be sentenced as a "habitual felony offender" as well.
The state appealed.
Assistant State Attorney Maureen Sullivan Christine could not be reached for comment Tuesday afternoon.
Assistant State Attorney Maureen Sullivan Christine could not be reached for comment Tuesday afternoon.
According to the appellate ruling, a convict can be sentenced as a "habitual felony offender" and as a "prisoner releasee reoffender," so long as the former status leads to a greater sentence


FLORIDA . The Cost Of The Three Strikes Law..
Judge Opposes $20 Life Sentence..
Three-Strikes Law Gives Court No Choice
WKMG-TV/DT Orlando | 7.16.03 --

A judge reluctantly gave a man life in prison after a $20 burglary, saying he had no choice under a state law that requires such terms for repeat offenders.
Circuit Judge Bob Wattles called the punishment unjust and unfair.

I dont have the authority or the power to not sentence you to life, Wattles told Maurice Leonard Reed, 37, of nearby Apopka, at his Tuesday sentencing.
Prosecutors had designated Reed a prison release re-offender under a state law that requires harsher penalties for some repeat offenders.
Reed was charged in February with robbery and burglary from an attempted undercover drug buy. He had jumped into an undercover officers car and offered to sell him drugs. When the deputy was distracted, Reed snatched a $20 bill from his hand, hit him in the face and jumped out of the car. He was convicted last month.
The Florida statute, in place since 1997, lets prosecutors seek enhanced sentences for people who commit certain felonies, such as burglary, within three years of release from prison.
As of the end of May, 302 people have been sentenced statewide under the law this year, according to the Florida Department of Corrections.
Reeds attorney, Christopher Smith, said he will appeal, challenging the burglary conviction.
I just felt this was a little overzealous, Smith said.
During his sentencing hearing, Reed acknowledged that he had led a life of crime. He has had convictions ranging from aggravated battery with a deadly weapon to cocaine and heroin sales.
I know Ive made some mistakes in my life, Reed told the judge. I dont think putting me away for life is going to bring on justice. I just come to the court for mercy.
The judge said his hands were tied and noted that the cost of Reeds incarceration will be $560,000 if he lives to be age 75.
You might get an appellate review, the judge said. You might have one glimmer of hope. Good luck, Mr. Reed.

Last March, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld lengthy sentences for two men who were convicted of petty thefts under Californias three strikes law.



***WRITTEN BY A MOTHER WHOSE SON HAS BEEN SENTENCED FOR LIFE WITHOUT PAROLE BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA ACORDING TO THE PRISONER RELEASEE REOFFENDER LAW FOR A CRIME THAT CARRIES A 2-5 YEAR SENTENCE
HE PAID HIS TIME FOR PREVIOUS CRIMES ALREADY***


- IF ONE OF THESE LAWS DOES NOT GET YOU ; THE OTHER ONE WILL-







LETS ALL SIGN A PETITION NOW........

TO GOVENOR BUSH ,FLORIDA POLITICIANS,CITIZENS OF FLORIDA

THIS MESSAGE IS NOT THE ANSWER TO THE CRIME SOLUTION

IN FACT GOVERNMENT PRESS RELEASES ABOUT CRIME STATISTICS ARE USELESS. THE PUBLIC HAS BEEN SWAYED INTO BELIEVING THAT CRIME IS DOWN BECAUSE OF THE FOLLOWING LAWS AND NOTHING IS FURTHER FROM THE TRUTH.

ABOLISH THE FOLLOWING LAWS IN STATE OF FLORIDA FROM THE DAY THEY WERE VOTED IN AS A LAW BY READING AND SIGNING THIS PETITION