Removal of Glenn Geffner from the Entercom/Boston Red Sox radio booth

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Dear Mr. Henry, Mr. Werner and Mr. Lucchino:

Disgusted legions of baseball fans turn its abused eardrums to you seeking relief. As baseball fans we do not ask for much, an occasional World Series title, a quality product on the field, a fan friendly experience and quality announcers.

We, the undersigned, certify that we are either loyal, devoted fans of Boston Red Sox baseball or loyal fans of the sport of baseball. As fans of the game we, the undersigned, feel that a franchise with the stature and history of the Boston Red Sox deserve to be represented by thorough and competent radio broadcasters. This ensures that the experience of Boston Red Sox baseball on the radio is both pleasurable for the loyal Red Sox fan and enjoyable for the fans of baseball in general.

In years past we were treated to the sounds and descriptions of the games that were provided to us by Curt Gowdy, Jim Woods and Ned Martin. Joe Castiglione continues on with the grand tradition of that broadcasting excellence. It is a shame and a disservice to Mr. Castiglione and fans of baseball on the radio that he be subjected to working a majority of the season with an inferior broadcasting partner. Mr. Castiglione and baseball fans everywhere deserve a better fate.

We ask that you bring Dave OBrien to the booth full time or, in lieu of that, you hire a quality announcer to fill in for Mr. OBrien during his ESPN commitments.

With this said, we the undersigned, feel it is time for the removal of Glenn Geffner from the Entercom/Boston Red Sox radio booth. The charges, against Mr. Geffner are many and below we present a partial pertinent list.

1. Geffner, while broadcasting games along the Red Sox radio network, appears to have never relinquished his position as the Vice President of Communications with the club. In effect, he is broadcasting games as a company whore. This is a large conflict of interest and a disservice to Red Sox and baseball fans everywhere.

2. While apparently an encyclopedia of baseball knowledge Geffner has no clue as to when to interject a fact, a story or tidbit to keep the flow and continuity of the game moving forward. We expected Encyclopedia Britannica and instead we got rain man.

3. Geffner feels his stories, facts or tidbits are more important than the game on the field often covering or glossing over the ongoing action in order to finish the long winded diatribe he started.

4. The chemistry in the booth, or lack there of, between Geffner and the voice of the Boston Red Sox Joe Castiglione is evident even to the casual listener of Red Sox baseball on the radio. While there is also no chemistry between Geffner and Dave OBrien as well it is unfair to criticize as the two rarely work together.

5. Geffners apparent broadcasting experience is limited as he is unpolished, coltish and unpoised in his delivery. He does not know when to interject or when to back off. After nearly an entire season there has been no improvement in his game delivery.

6. A franchise with the stature of the Boston Red Sox should have two (or three) highly talented broadcasters calling the games. The reasons are two fold because first off the club can afford to pay the talent. Secondly, the radio calls are still the connection that many loyal fans have to this team. People listen to larger segments of the games on the radio, especially on weekends and for day games. They are the voice of the franchise and the eyes of the fans.

7. Geffner rarely if ever criticizes the players or the organization even when it is deserved preferring instead the life is beautiful approach to the game. It is evident he is afraid to be critical in light of his position as the Vice President of Communications.

8. Geffner fails to paint the picture of the game for the listener. He rarely tells you what a pitch was, which way the shortstop went to field the ball, fails to use descriptive phrases and regularly relies on minutia that has nothing to do with the game.

9. Geffner fails to understand the pace of a baseball game. Each game sounds as if it is the first game he has ever seen. The action becomes rushed, his words jumble together and his pronunciation and enunciation is terrible.